Tag Archives: Liver

Fibre and how to get it

Fibre: Why it’s important and How to get more

We often hear about the importance of certain food components, but fibre tends not to make the headlines very often. Fibre is not glamorous, but it deserves as much attention as essential fatty acids, protein and vitamins.

I wanted to take some time to set down exactly why fibre is important. It is not less or more important than vitamins, minerals, protein and fats to our health, but the fact is, without enough dietary fibre, we are susceptible to some unpleasant health concerns and even some cancers.

WHAT IS FIBRE?

Fibre is the component of plant cell walls and cannot be digested or absorbed into our bloodstream. There are two types of fibre, soluble and insoluble, and you can find them in vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, seeds and grains.

Soluble fibre tends to ‘dissolve’ or turn to gel in our digestive systems. If you have ever soaked flax or chia seeds you’ll know what I mean. Insoluble fibre does not absorb or dissolve in water but remains in its original form and helps move bulk through the intestines. You need both types of fibre for a healthy digestive system.

WHY IS FIBRE IMPORTANT?

  1. Fibre is critical for detoxification: One of the most important functions of fibre is to keep things moving through our digestive system. If you have fewer than one bowel movement a day, it is possible that you are constipated and fibre can help improve your transit time. If you are not having regular bowel movements you may feel sluggish, experience skin rashes, headaches or an inability to lose weight.

Fibre binds to bile and eliminates it from the body. Bile is manufactured in the liver and holds all the toxins that the liver has processed. If a person has a low fibre diet, the bile and its toxic load not bound in the faeces very well and they are reabsorbed. This can impact us in many ways, here are two examples:

Hormone balance: the liver processes hormones that have been used and packages them up in the bile for excretion. If there is not enough fibre in the gut, the hormones are reabsorbed and can contribute to issues like PMS, acne and oestrogenic cancers.

Heavy metals: The liver normally clears 1% of the body load of mercury every day. However 99% of what is excreted in the bile is often reabsorbed due to insufficient dietary fibre.

  1. Fibre helps to prevent diabetes and weight gain by keeping blood sugar levels balanced: fibre slows down the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, increases cell sensitivity to insulin and improves the uptake of glucose by the liver. This keeps your blood sugar levels balanced and helps to prevent weight gain.
  2. Fibre could prevent cancer: studies have indicated that a diet high in fibre can be protective against colorectal and breast cancers.
  3. Fibre helps manage high cholesterol and prevent cardiovascular disease: legumes and oats in particular, appear to be effective in lowering total and LDL cholesterol.
  4. Fibre feeds gut bacteria: Data is now showing that a good diversity of gut bacteria is essential for good health – from immunity to mental health and autoimmune conditions. Gut bacteria feed on fibre, so if we don’t feed them, they will die off which is very bad news for us. In essence, we cannot be healthy without good gut bacteria, so we cannot be healthy on a low fibre diet.

Butternut soup

HOW TO GET MORE FIBRE INTO YOUR DIET

The typical western diet is generally low on fibre – foods like pasta, bread, potatoes, dairy and meat make up the majority of plates and have little to no fibre. Therefore, it is not surprising that heart disease, diabetes, colorectal cancer and gut-associated disturbances are on the rise.

The following foods are full of fibre and contribute to a balanced, healthy diet. Remember to eat them whole and unprocessed to get the most fibre.

Vegetables: All vegetables have fibre, which is one of the reasons why people who eat a plant-based diet* tend to have lower levels of chronic conditions and live longer. Remember, much of the fibre resides in the skins, so don’t peel your potatoes, carrots or parsnips – just give them a good scrub and cook as usual.

Artichokes, beetroot, broccoli, peas, Brussels sprouts and carrots are particularly high in fibre.

Fruits: Fruits can be very sugary, but fibre helps to slow down the release of the sugar into your blood stream. Apples, pears, prunes, figs and dates have the highest levels of fibre. Fruit juices do not contain much (or any) fibre, so please avoid them.

Legumes: Haricot beans (i.e. baked beans), chickpeas, lentils, black beans and broad beans are brilliant legume sources of fibre. They are also good sources of protein, vitamins and minerals. If you are cooking them from dry, remember to soak overnight in warm water with a little acid (lemon juice or vinegar). This helps to pull out enzymes that block the absorption of essential minerals.

Wholegrains: When it comes to grains, always opt for brown/wholegrain options. The fibre in grains tends to in the outer covering, which are removed to make them white (i.e. white bread, white pasta, white rice). When you remove the outer husk, you remove the fibre which means these foods will have a higher glycemic load (i.e. cause havoc with your blood sugar levels). Oats, barley, brown rice, rye, quinoa and spelt are the best grains and full of fibre. Also try to soak grains in warm, acidulated water before cooking.

THE POWER OF PLANTS

The reasons why a plant-based diet is good for us go beyond the vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients that are important to good health. The fibre that they provide us is invaluable. Imagine a world without fuel for our cars, buses or planes? It would come to a standstill. That is exactly what happens to our bodies without fibre – we literally cannot operate properly without it – we cannot detoxify and our good bacteria cannot survive.

Unlike vitamins, minerals, protein and good fats, there are no real supplement options for fibre, so you really must eat real food to keep your system healthy – there are no shortcuts!

Fibre is essential to overall good health, maintaining energy levels and avoiding lifestyle diseases. Are you getting enough?

Here are some top tips to get more fibre into your diet:

  1. Add chickpeas, lentils or beans to your soup or stew. Legumes are full of fibre and adding them to stews and soups are a great way to bulk out meat-based dishes and improve the nutrient content of your meal.
  2.  Keep the skin on! Did you know that much of a fruit or vegetable’s fibre content is in the skin? Leave the skin on apples, carrots, parsnips, beetroot, potatoes, sweet potatoes and butternut squash to increase your fibre intake and keep your immune system healthy.
  3. Get seedy! Seeds are fabulous sources of fibre. They are also full of protein, minerals and healthy fats. Add them to your porridge, smoothie or even bake with them.
  4. Aim to eat 5-7 portions of vegetables and fruit daily. It may sound like a lot, but fruit and veg are some of the best sources of fibre that provide food for our gut bacteria and help us eliminate toxins. An easy way to add more vegetables to your diet is to use them to replace low fibre carbohydrates like pasta. Try courgette noodles or cauliflower rice!
  5. Snack with fibre. Instead of the sweet biscuit or cake, choose snacks filled with fibre. Not only are they better for your digestive system, they will also keep your blood sugar levels balanced, giving you more energy. Snack on walnuts, almonds or Brazil nuts or try nut butter on oatcakes or hummus with vegetable sticks.

Check out these fibre-full recipes:

Bircher Muesli (oats, nuts, needs)

Chia Pudding (chia seeds)

Huevos Rancheros (beans, avocados)

Butternut Soup (butternut, skin on)

Sweet Potato Fishcakes (sweet potatoes, oats)

Beetroot hummus (beetroot, chickpeas, tahini)

High Fibre Rusks (nuts, seeds, coconut)

*Plant-based diets are not necessarily vegetarian or vegan diets. They are diets that focus on eating plenty of fresh produce, which may be supplemented with good quality protein and healthy fats.

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Beetroot Risotto with Walnuts and Goat’s Cheese (vegetarian, gluten-free)

Beetroot is just coming into season in Europe and this recipe is a perfect for the not-so-hot summer we are experiencing in Ireland.

Risotto’s make brilliant meals – they are extremely versatile and the saviour of those looking for gluten-free options on menus. They can be warming in winter and crisp and cheerful in summer. This recipe would work well across the seasons, so give it a try this month and save it up for those winter days when you need a bit of bright pink cheeriness in your life.

Beetroot Benefits

I’ve written about beetroot before, but as a reminder, here are 8 health benefits of eating this beautiful root:

  1. Beetroot may help lower blood pressure. It is rich in nitrates, which convert to nitric oxide, a chemical thought to lower blood pressure.
  2. Beetroot is high in fibre. This helps keep your digestive and immune systems in good nick.
  3. Beetroot is high in folate, which makes it a must for ladies who are pregnant or looking to conceive.
  4. Beetroot is a brilliant source of vitamin C – eat plenty to keep your skin healthy and your immune system supported.
  5. Beetroot is a great source of the minerals potassium, magnesium and iron.
  6. Beetroot is also a source of phytosterols – the compounds that help reduce ‘bad’ LDL cholesterol.
  7. Beetroot contains betaine, which protects cells from environmental damage. Betaine has been associated with lower levels of several inflammatory markers, including C reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha.
  8. Beetroot is great for liver health. The betalain pigments in beetroot support your body’s Phase 2 detoxification process.

Beetroot risotto

The Whole Package

The health benefits of this recipe are pretty good, but that’s just the cherry on top. The flavours of the beetroot, walnut and goats cheese are lovely together, and the rocket adds a kick of peppery freshness to offset the earthiness of the other ingredients. A bowl of this risotto is a real treat that happens to be good for you. It’s also quite pretty (I think) and is relatively easy on the pocket.

So, banish the beige and add a bit of flair to your dinner table this week.

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 litre (1¾pints) vegetable or chicken stock
  • ½ cup walnuts
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 250g (8oz) risotto rice
  • 125ml (3 ½ fl oz) white wine (optional)
  • 300g (11oz) fresh beetroot, peeled and grated
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 50g (2oz) butter*
  • 50g rindless goat’s cheese*
  • Rocket leaves, to serve

Method

  1. Bring the stock to the boil in a saucepan, then turn the heat right down until barely simmering.
  2. While the stock is heating, toast the walnuts in a frying pan over a medium heat. Be careful not to burn them. Remove from the heat and set aside.
  3. In a medium-sized saucepan, heat the olive oil and gently sauté the onions.
  4. Add the rice and stir until well coated.
  5. Add the wine, or if not using, a ladle of stock. Stir until the liquid has been absorbed.
  6. Continue to add ladleful’s of stock, one at a time, stirring continuously.
  7. After three ladles, add the grated beetroot and garlic and stir well.
  8. Continue to add the stock in batches and stir until the rice is cooked, but still firm.
  9. Once the rice is cooked, stir in the butter and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  10. Serve in individual bowls and top with crumbled goat’s cheese, the toasted walnuts and a handful of rocket leaves.

* If you are looking for a dairy-free option, swap the butter for 3 tbs olive oil and omit the cheese (although some with cow’s milk intolerance can manage goat’s milk).

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Heart healthy beetroot hummus

Beetroot Hummus (and why you need to eat it)

Escalate hummus to a vibrant, earthy treat with the addition of beautiful beetroot.

Hummus is one of my all-time favourite foods. It is a simple Middle Eastern staple that is both delicious and super-nutritious at the same time. A winning combination!

Made from chickpeas, garlic, lemon juice and tahini (sesame seed paste), hummus (or houmous), has become increasingly popular in the last decade with tubs available at most supermarkets, corner shops and delis.

The good stuff

Besides being absolutely delicious, hummus is a popular ‘go-to’ food for nutritionists.

Here are five reasons why hummus should be a fridge staple.

    1. Hummus is high in fibre. Chickpeas are an excellent source of dietary fibre. Most western diets do not include good levels of fibre which is necessary to keep your cholesterol in check, balance your blood sugar levels and keep your hormones in harmony.
    2. Hummus is high in protein. Chickpeas are rich in the amino acids lycine, isoleucine and tryptophan. This makes hummus an excellent source of protein for vegetarians and vegans. Amino acids are the building blocks of our cells, so it is important to include a variety of sources in our diets.
    3. Hummus keeps your blood sugar balanced. In order to avoid peaks and troughs in your blood sugar levels, I always recommend that snacks should contain an element of fibre, protein or fat (as these slow down the release of sugar into your blood stream). Swapping sugary snacks for wholesome alternatives like hummus will help you maintain your energy levels and help you manage sugar cravings.
    4. Hummus is rich in phytonutrients. Garlic, chickpeas and the sesames in tahini are a holy trinity of superfoods. Your heart and liver will be jumping for joy. Garlic’s medicinal benefits have been recognised for decades. Its compounds have been shown to decrease the synthesis of cholesterol in the liver, help with inflammation and enhance the immune system. Sesame seeds and chickpeas are rich in a group of phytonutrients called lignans.  Lignans have mild oestrogenic properties, which is why lignan-containing foods are recommended for women moving into menopause or for those with hormonal imbalances. Lignans have also been associated with reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.
    5. Hummus is convenient. Hummus is portable, so makes a great snack on the go. A tub in the workplace fridge will last a few days and, paired with an oatcake, carrot sticks or some rye bread will provide a quick, easy, filling snack.

Homemade beetroot hummus

Beetroot Boost

This version of hummus incorporates the marvellous superfood beetroot. Its vivid colour is a tell-tale sign that this vegetable is packed full of health-promoting nutrients.

Besides gifting this hummus dip with its awesome colour, beetroot also lends a slightly earthy taste to the recipe, as well as additional fibre and antioxidants.

Studies have shown that beetroot may be helpful in lowering blood pressure. Furthermore, the prominent phytonutrient in beetroot, betaine, protects cells and enzymes from environmental stress and fights inflammation. Beetroot also supports Phase 2 liver detoxification.

So, while hummus is excellent in its traditional form, adding beetroot takes it to another level.

Enjoy this delicious dip with a virtuous smile on your face. It is also a great way to get children’s lunchboxes healthy and bright.

The ultimate healthy snack

Ingredients

  • 1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 250g cooked beetroot (about 2 medium beetroot), peeled and cubed
  • 2 tbs tahini (sesame seed paste)
  • 1 large clove garlic, peeled
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 250ml water (approx.)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Method

  1. Put the chickpeas, beetroot, tahini, lemon juice, cumin and half the water into a food processor and blend, scraping down the sides with a spatula a few times.
  2. Continue blending and slowly add the rest of the water until you have the consistency you desire – you may need to add a bit more.
  3. Add salt and pepper to taste and give it a final whizz.
  4. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for 3-4 days.

Serve as a snack with oatcakes or vegetable batons, on rye toast for breakfast or lunch with avocado and pumpkin seeds or inside a pita with salads. This beetroot hummus pairs well with horseradish, mint and halloumi (not necessarily all together!).

 

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Immune-boosting paleo cauliflower fried rice

Immune Boosting Cauliflower Fried Rice

This is a brilliant comfort-foody dish that you will love!

Made from scratch, it won’t take you much longer than 30 minutes to from start to finish and it is sooo tasty!

Cauliflower rice is very chic these days. Whether you’re trying to avoid carbs for weight loss or need to avoid grains for health reasons, the net outcome is that replacing rice with cauliflower will not have a negative effect on your diet. In fact, it will super-boost your vegetable intake without even trying. This dish is all vegetable with some egg (and optional meat/fish) for a bit of protein.

A vegetable super hero, returned

In 2010, a study showed that UK sales of cauliflower had fallen 35% in 10 years. This was driven mostly by a younger generation perceiving cauliflower to be old fashioned and not versatile.

However, cauliflower has had a bit of a comeback in the last few years thanks to the increasing popularity of the paleo diet and the increasing number of people looking for gluten-free alternatives to their favourite dishes.

New ways of thinking about cauliflower have proved that it is one of the most versatile vegetables out there. From pizza crusts, tortilla wraps, rice, mash and steaks (yes, steak, that’s not a typo), the cauliflower revolution is well under way and, I for one, am so pleased.

The good stuff

Cauliflower is not the most glamorous looking vegetable and, it doesn’t have the green colour that gives it’s brothers and sisters in the brassica family their healthy street cred. But looks can be deceiving…

Did you know that one cup of cauliflower will provide you with 77% of your RDA of vitamin C? It’s also particularly high in folate, vitamin B6, potassium and magnesium.

Being a member of the brassica family, it also contains glucosinolates which  are showing positive anti-cancer effects in studies. These compounds are also great for balancing hormones, so eating a daily portion of brassicas (cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, kale etc) is important for all women.

Immune Booster

This fried rice dish is chock full of fresh, tasty ingredients that are particularly good for your liver. Even better, a bowl will provide you with an army of immune-boosting nutrients: cauliflower, peppers, chilli and spinach all contain good amounts of vitamin C, and, the supporting team of ginger, garlic and mushrooms all contain brilliant anti-flu, pro-immune compounds. It’s an alternative to chicken soup!

Paleo vegetarian cauliflower fried rice

 

Ingredients

Serves 2-3 (generously)

  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil (or butter)
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 onion, finely diced (or 3 spring onions, sliced)
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 1 pack chestnut or shiitake mushrooms, sliced (you can reconstitute dried shiitake if you can’t find fresh)
  • 2 garlic cloves crushed
  • 1 thumb-sized chunk of ginger, finely grated
  • 2 teaspoons dried chilli flakes (or ½ fresh chilli)
  • 1 small head cauliflower (or ½ large head), cut in florets
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (or soy sauce / tamari)
  • 2 handfuls spinach
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • Optional extras: peas, finely sliced carrots, bean sprouts
  • Method
  1. Heat ½ tablespoon of oil in a large saucepan over a med-high heat. Add the eggs and cook into a thin omelette. Remove from heat, slice into thin ribbons and set aside
  2. Heat the remaining oil in the hot pan and sauté the onions until tender.
  3. Add the red peppers and fry for another 1-2 minutes
  4. Add the mushrooms and fry for another few minutes until soft, then add the garlic, ginger and chilli flakes
  5. While the vegetables are frying, whizz the cauliflower in a food processor until you get coarse, rice-sized bits – avoid over blending. If you don’t have a food processor, you can grate the cauliflower
  6. Add the cauliflower rice to the pan and toss with the vegetables. Put a lid on the pan and cook for 6-7 minutes until the cauliflower is tender but not mushy.
  7. Add the fish sauce and spinach and toss well.
  8. Once the spinach has just wilted, remove the pan from the heat, add the sesame oil and egg ribbons and toss through.
  9. Serve on warmed plates as is, or with your choice of beef, salmon or chicken.

Keep any left overs in a sealed container in the fridge and warm up by re-frying over a medium heat.

Note: the fish sauce and sesame oil are central to this dish’s flavour – I recommend that you use them to enjoy the dish to its full effect.

Inspired and adapted from this recipe

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Broccoli and Fennel Soup with Almonds (vegan, gluten free)

Creamy broccoli and fennel soup

This soup was thrown together in an attempt to use up a glut of vegetables in the fridge.

I had bought some fennel on a whim in the week, so I knew I needed to use it. I wanted something warm and hearty, so a soup seemed like a good idea. I wanted an element of protein, but didn’t feel like adding legumes – so almonds came to the rescue. I was going to call this soup ‘The Kitchen Sink’, but after tasting it, I thought that would do it a disservice.

It tasted good, so it’s made it onto the blog. Also, the more I looked at the ingredients, the more I realised that together the ingredients are a brilliant tonic for a number of ailments. This is the soup you want to make if you are feeling a little under the weather (great immune boosting qualities), but would be equally good for ladies who need to balance their hormones. Here’s why.

Fresh fennel bulb

Fennel

If you’ve eaten fennel before, you’ll know that the stylish white bulb with feathery leaves has a subtle aniseed-y flavour that adds both depth and freshness, depending on how it’s cooked.

Medicinally, fennel’s properties are widely known. Fennel has been used for increasing lactation, promoting menstruation and increasing libido – these possibly linked to the subtle oestrogenic effect of some of its constituents. But it is as a carminative where fennel is particularly effective. It’s been used for centuries to soothe gas and bloating in both adults and infants.

Fennel has also been shown to be effective for respiratory problems – so there’s no harm in getting in a good dose if you’re fighting off a chesty cold.

Nutritionally, fennel bulb is a great source of fibre, vitamin C and folate.

Broccoli

One of my favourite friends. Broccoli has so many excellent nutritional properties, I could write a whole blog post on it alone. In the interests of brevity and to stay on topic, I’ll summarise as follows:

    • 100g provides almost double the amount of vitamin C than an orange
    • Broccoli contains glucobrassicin, which is broken down to indole-3-caribinole (I3C). I3C improves oestrogen metabolism and is particularly effective on ‘bad’ oestrogen (16-alpha-hydroxysestrone). I3C also seems to have antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus (the one that gives you cold sores).
    • Broccoli is a sulphurous vegetable. This means that it provide excellent support to the liver
    • There are a good number of studies showing convincing anti-cancer properties of broccoli
    • Broccoli is very high in antioxidants
    • Broccoli contains sulfophane, which is anti-inflammatory

The support team

Onion, ginger and garlic are well known for fighting colds. They have excellent anti-microbial properties and provide your body with extra immune-boosting compounds. Onions and garlic are also great for your liver, so therefore good news for hormone metabolism.

Coconut oil, also has anti-microbial properties, so definitely use this if you’re under the weather.

Now, don’t let the thought of almonds in a soup put you off. The almonds provide a wonderful creamy texture without a particularly nutty taste. If you are struggling with a chesty cold, dairy can sometimes aggravate symptoms, so almonds are a brilliant alternative to a dairy creamer in your soup or stew. They also provide a good amount of protein and fibre to this dish to ensure that it keeps you fuller for longer. It is better to soak the almonds before using them in the soup, so remember to prepare them at least an hour before you start cooking – you could really soak them all day.

 

Ingredients

  • 1 onion, finely sliced
  • 1 fennel, finely sliced
  • 2 stalks of celery, finely sliced
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil or butter
  • 1 litre stock (vegetable or organic chicken)
  • 1 medium head broccoli, in florets
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • ¼ cup whole raw almonds, soaked for at least 1 hour
  • Salt and pepper
  • Squeeze of lemon
  • Drizzle of olive oil

Method

  1. Heat a medium saucepan and sauté the onion, fennel and ginger in the oil until soft
  2. Add the stock and bring to the boil
  3. Lower the soup to a simmer and add the broccoli and garlic. Simmer until the broccoli is just cooked and remove from the heat.
  4. Thoroughly rinse the almonds and place them in a liquidiser with ½ cup of the soup broth. Blend until the nuts break down.
  5. Add the rest of the soup to the liquidiser jug and blend until smooth. The soup may still be quite hot, so blend in short spurts and open the lid after every blitz to allow steam to escape. Hold the lid of the liquidiser down with a tea towel to protect your hand. You could also use a stick blender for this step.
  6. Return the lovely creamy soup to the saucepan and test the seasoning. Add salt and freshly ground pepper to your taste.
  7. Serve in warmed bowls with a squeeze of lemon and a drizzle of olive oil.

 

 

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Reindeer

8 ways to get through the festive season in one piece

The festive season is a wonderful time of year when we can, more or less guilt-free, indulge in regular bouts of cheerful revelry, rich food and late nights. Most of us acknowledge that this is an exceptional part of the year when we can forget about being good and pick up the pieces in January.

I personally love the festive season and look forward to it. Besides the opportunity to let your hair down and celebrate with friends, there’s all that lovely food we’ve been holding out for all year.

However, the good times can take a toll on your health. Late nights, rich food and alcohol create a heavy load for your body to process. Now, I am not going to be a killjoy and recommend you forgo the champagne and Christmas puds for elderflower cordial and tofu cheesecake. I think that the period of festivities, reconnecting with families and friends, and good home cooking, is a wonderful tonic after a year of hard work. It is important to have joy and fun in life. Sometimes that means giving in to foods that we know are not healthful.

It’s not great, but it happens. Because your lifestyle should never be ‘all or nothing’, I’ve listed out eight ways you can be kinder to your body during the festive season. These are small, yet practical things you can do to help your system stay strong whilst you make the most of a fabulous time of year!

1. Protect your liver. Everything you put in your body gets processed by the liver. The bigger the load, the more work, so keeping your liver in good shape during the festive season is important.

For many, the festive season is characterised by higher-than-average consumption of alcohol and rich food. The first thing you can do is take preventative measure to protect your liver. Think about taking a good milk thistle supplement. The active ingredient in milk thistle, silymarin has been shown to protect the liver. In addition, milk thistle can also aid digestion.

2. Get your greens (and reds and yellows!). Christmas parties and festive dinners tend to focus on carbohydrates and protein. But don’t forget to ‘eat a rainbow’. You need to vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients from fruit and vegetables to keep in good health.

Cruciferous vegetables are especially important help your liver detoxify during periods of indulgence. Broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts are packed with B vitamins and a host of compounds that maximise liver function. Brightly coloured fruit and vegetables contain antioxidants that help mop up free radicals – important every day, but even more so when we have more alcohol and rich food flowing through our systems.

3. Be good at breakfast. Breakfast truly does set you up for the day. During busy times, it’s also one of the meals you have the most control over.

If you know you’ll be out and about, use breakfast as an opportunity to get in the nutrients you may not get throughout the rest of the day. Make sure to include a source of protein. This will balance your blood sugar and help prevent sugar cravings during the day. A warming bowl of oatmeal will provide you with fibre and B vitamins. Top with cinnamon, fresh berries or grated apple and sprinkle with milled seeds and ground almonds for protein (what’s more Christmassy than almond, berries and cinnamon?!). Eggs are also fabulous. They contain sulphur which helps your liver do its thing. Try an omelette with two big handfuls of spinach, and sautéed tomatoes, onions and peppers.

4. Hydrate. Water is essential to most bodily functions and it is always important to keep well hydrated. Alcohol and caffeine can dehydrate your body, so if you find yourself over-indulging during the festive season, you need to be especially vigilant in topping up your water levels!

Water helps flush out toxins and aids in the secretion of digestive juices. If you’re not getting enough, you’ll feel sluggish and will battle to manage large, hearty meals. Make sure you drink at least 1.5 litres across the day (caffeinated tea and coffee don’t count!).

5. Choose organic where you can. I am a big believer in organic foods, but I am realistic that it can be pricey. If you are going to pick specific foods to buy organic, then animal products are where you should invest.

Meat, dairy and eggs carry by-products of hormones and antibiotics used in animal farming (particularly poultry and eggs). As these items make up the bulk of most festive menus, try and buy organic if you are cooking animal products over the season – the taste and quality will be better and again, you’ll be doing your poor old liver a favour.

6. Don’t drink on an empty stomach. Eating is not cheating! Drinking on an empty stomach is a fool’s game – it takes you over the limit quicker, makes you feel worse off the next day and causes you to made bad food choices.

Alcohol often results in a rapid increase in blood glucose levels followed by a drop. When your blood sugar levels drop, you start craving food – particularly sugary, carby foods (think late night chips and kebabs). Making sure you eat before or during drinking will help avoid the blood-sugar rollercoaster, and, hopefully leave you feeling a little more in control at the end of the night.

7. Sleep. Don’t underestimate the effect a string of late nights can have on your health. Impaired sleep or sleep deprivation can wreak havoc on your physical and mental well-being.

To avoid waking up in January like a zombie, make time in your busy festive calendar to get good amounts of restorative sleep.

8. Have fun! Laughter and enjoyment are essential to good physical and emotional health. If you’re going to be partaking in the full festive experience, make sure that you’re getting all the upsides – laughter enhances the immune system and helps the body release mood-elevating endorphins.

Even better, pass the joy on. If you know of anyone feeling low over the festive season, even a small gesture can improve their well-being and it doesn’t cost much.

Season’s greetings to you all!

Need a kick-start into the new year? My FreshStart 28-day programme will be launching in January. If you want to clear out those cobwebs and start 2016 in a good place (nutritionally), this step-by-step programme will set you up! Get in touch if you would like more information.  

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